other services

home page


mobile phones

maps

italian traffic

something to look forward to...

useful tips

useful numbers

worried about getting lost?

luggage transportation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 other services

home page


mobile phones

When travelling by motorcycle these little friends can be life savers.

If you are stuck for any reason on the road, you will be able to get help very quickly. May this be the rental station, your hotel, the police or an ambulance.
W
e have a selection of mobile phones with Italian "pay as you go" SIM cards, which we supply to whoever takes part in our tours and to whomever requests one for their rental.

These have a free rental charge, subject to availability,  to those of you taking part in the tours or have booked a rental exceeding 10 days.

To others who want to have a mobile whilst riding in Italy the cost will be 5euro/day.

You will be charged only for the credit used during you the time you have it. A credit reading will be done at the beginning and one will be done at the end. You'll pay the difference.

back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 other services

home page


maps

there are really only two maps which we believe to be useful companions whilst riding in Italy. TCI (Touring Club Italia) 1:200.000 and Michelin 1:400.000 maps.

we will supply you one map f.o.c. when you book a 3 day rental or more with us and will supply additional ones at the cost of 7 euro.
The TCI maps are extremely detailed and have green scenic route markings.
If you like we can mark the motorcycling relevant roads with a highlighter before posting the maps to you.

back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 other services

home page


 

luggage transportation

if you are a group and would like to organise your own tour visiting specific places or taking part to specific events and you need help with the logistic of transporting your luggage let us know.

Prices for luggage transportation: 150euro/day plus expenses

back to top

 

 

 

 

 


 other services

home page


 

Worried about getting lost?
Concerned about the language?
Think you'll miss out on the best rides?


Then all you need to do is hire Francesco to ride with you. A mine of information, speaks English and German as well as Italian, knows the best roads and when it's the best time to ride them, rides according to your pace and knows where you can eat the best food and drink excellent wine!! He's also a very likeable chap, with a splendid sense of humour but always professional and discrete.

If you're coming for a weekend take advantage of a local rider to help you get the most out of it. Helping you through traffic, with translations, solving any problems you might meet, choosing an ongoing selection of twisties you'd never find on your own in a short time.

Enquire about the cost. Especially for groups this may be lower than you think. info@cimt.it


Can you trust this man on a motorcycle???Follow me!!! You'll find out!!!

back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 other services

home page


 

italian traffic

 

It's really not as bad as you are lead to believe. Italy has a myth surrounding it that it is total anarchy as far as traffic and driving habits are concerned. The truth instead is that it is in fact a safer place for bikes than most parts of the world. There are more motorcycles and scooters around in Italy than anywhere else in the world. Only in Rome and surrounding areas the estimate is 1,000,000 two wheeled vehicles. Given the numbers, car drivers are more used to dealing with bikes and will act respectfully.

In big cities such as Rome, Milan and Naples you will get the impression of chaos and it is true that it is generally difficult to find your way around. Our advice here is to get out in to the country as soon as possible and if you like to visit these cities do it with public transport but not on the bike. Smaller towns such as Siena, Arezzo, Sorrento etc. will be no problem at all in this respect. In the country the riding is fantastic and virtually traffic free.

Below you can find a small list of useful information and tips which may come in handy when you ride over here...

a) you are allowed to split lanes and ride passed cars up to a red light. It's expected of motorcycles so no car driver will take offence. Especially with stationary traffic you will be allowed to slowly make your way to the front of the line.

b) the safest way in traffic is to go with the flow.

c) The Autostrada. Autostradas are always marked in green as opposed to the SS (strade statali), equivalent of A- roads, which are always marked in blue. The Autostradas normally have pay tolls. Motorcycles are only allowed through at the manned booths. You should never enter the yellow lanes marked as TELEPASS unless, on smaller stations, they are marked as both manual and telepass. The TELEPASS exits and entries are only for cars and trucks which have special electronic devices on board. If you accidentally go through a TELEPASS lane stop and comunicate  your mistake to the station or next PUNTO BLU (information point of the Autstrade). If you don't then the rental station will get a huge bill from the Autostrade for the longest distance possible on that section. This will then be charged on your credit card, with prior notification, of course. You should also avoid entering the VIACARD lanes, especially if they display a "no Motorcycle entry" sign. These booths are triggered by the amount of weight and presence of metal and sometimes won't read a motorcycle, so you'll be sitting there with your ticket and no chance to pay or to go anywhere until the station manually triggers the booth. This can take quite a while. You might be lucky and a car comes behind you triggering the booth, but if you are a group of bikes then that won't happen and you will block the booth completely. The VIACARD booths only take credit cards so if you intended to pay cash you won't be able to. The VIACARD lanes are always marked in Blue.
Manned  booths are the ones you should always aim for, even if there is a queue. All manned booths accept credit cards. It is our advice to use them as you won't have to waste time with change and cash. The following picture shows you what a medium sized station looks like. For more information click here for a useful link!

.Autostrade Toll station - A1 Firenze Certosa

On the Autostrada keep the pace up. You'll still find big Mercedes, BMWs or Alfas which will pass you but at a reasonable speed you have the time to see them coming in your rear-view mirrors.
Speed limits:
130km/h autostrada, 110km/h autostrada in the rain, 90km/h outside built up areas, 30km/h and 50km/h in towns. You are liable for any traffic offences!! The police can notify us up to 150 days after the offence has taken place. 


speedcamerad) Speed cameras:
One word of warning
; this is what a non attended speed camera looks like in Tuscany. Normally they are placed in very sensible places to slow people down entering built up areas or by schools so when approaching such places just slow down and check your speed and the speed limit. It could be 30km/h instead of 50km/h. It may feel desperately slow but it will save you a lot of aggravation later!


 

 

e) Police: there are 4 types of Police you need to be aware of. CARABINIERI: Dark blue cars with white roof and red stripes. Polizia Stradale: Light blue cars with POLIZIA down the side in white. Guardia di Finanza: Dark blue cars with GUARDIA DI FINANZA in yellow and green hats. POLIZIA MUNICIPALE: This is the hardest to spot. Normally white cars with red, blue or green writing. All police have the right to stop you and ask for documents s. Always have the following documents with you when riding: insurance, driving license, log book, passport. They'll signal normally by waving you over with a white lollipop with a red centre.  Do stop, please!! You have nothing to fear. You have all the documents and it is likely that as soon as they realise that you are foreign and do not speak a word of  Italian, they'll let you get on with your riding. Whatever happens be friendly, they are, in most cases, very nice people and most of them bikers too ;-))) !!! click below to enlarge the pictures.

polizia stradale

 

f) a new traffic law came into effect on the 30th June 2003. It is much stricter on speeding, alcohol consumption and safety precautions. In Italy there is a helmet law. Anything on two wheels with an engine requires a helmet. In summer and in the south of Italy there is a tendency on behalf of Italian riders not to wear a helmet on scooters. Do not be fooled by thinking you can do the same and get away with it.

h) Parking a motorcycle. there are specific places where you can park marked for motorcycles and scooters but you can also park where cars are parked. If there are blue lines on the floor it means that it is a pay and display area. Sometimes it is specified that bikes may not park there but normally bikes do not have to pay as as soon as you display the ticket it flies away. Be sensible, however, and take up as little room as possible. You'll see many scooters and motorcycles parked on the pavement. Whilst we strongly suggest you don't, you can get away with it if there are no other options and you leave enough space for pedestrians. But be aware it is an offence and you could get fined.

f) Access to city centres. Normally on two wheels you have no restrictions for access to the historical centres of towns. However in some cases you'll be stopped. In Rome for example between 10am and 8pm there is no access to the very centre (Tridente) to non residents. Normally the town police will be there to prevent you from accessing. 

g) Avoid bike theft  by  always  locking your rental bike and finding secure overnight parking. If you have booked a hotel with no parking always ask reception if they have a garden or other closed area. Sometimes they'll let you park it in the reception of the Hotel!!! It's happened before! Do not leave passports, cash and valuable items in the motorcycle cases. These are the easiest  to get broken into during the day.

 

IMPORTANT: THESE ARE ONLY TIPS AND CIMT CANNOT BE HELD LIABLE FOR ANYTHING IN RELATION TO THE ABOVE. BE YOUR OWN JUDGE IN ANY CIRCUMSTANCE!!

back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 other services

home page


 

something to look forward to...

Here is what Italy has to offer:

a) almost traffic free roads. The Italian population concentrates in cities which normally lie in motorcycling uninteresting places leaving the mountains and coastlines free for us to play with!

b) an improving road surface. a lot has been done over the past 3 years and more is being done. 

c) variety of scenery

d) variety of excellent food

e) in the heart of any Italian hides a motorcyclist.

f) For him: some of the most beautiful women on earth... also the hardest ones to live with!!!  you are warned!!!

g) For her:  Italian male bikers are always in awe of a female biker. You will have top respect !! I will abstain from any  comment on Italian men! Our reputation precedes us ...

h) For a couple: there is hardly another place on Earth more romantic than Italy !!! 

back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 other services

home page


 

useful tips to prepare your riding...

 

My Grandmother always used to say that you will do your journeys at least three times. The first time with your fantasy: dreaming, reading, researching, planning. The second time you actually do it: in some cases it is a magnificent improvement on your dreams and sometimes less so. The third time and all the times after that when you re-live it with the person you travelled with or with your friends and family looking at your pictures and looking at the maps. 

Here we'll try to help you in preparing your next motorcycle adventure in Italy:

a) plan ahead - last minute decisions will make it an expensive and dispersive effort

b) don't be afraid to ask - better safe than sorry!

c) select the right season - it's pointless to want to ride the Alps in Winter or along the Costiera Amalfitana in August. There are perfect times for each area. In the interesting riding areas we do specify these periods and if in doubt just ask.

d) don't push it - what we mean by this is: you won't be able to ride the whole of Italy in a week. Not even if you ride all of the autostrada. Although Italy is about the same size but California there's so much to see and to ride that you should leave yourself time and come more than once.

e) don't plan everything - leave some space for the unexpected. If you book all of your hotels and set yourself fixed daily targets filling all hours, you are running the risk of transforming your holiday into a marathon. Leave space for surprises! Leave space to enjoy a different pace!

f) don't think a road is the same riding it the other way - The Costiera Amalfitana is only 60km/40miles long but you'll need two or  three days to be able to say that  you have really ridden it. You'll have to ride it at least twice in each direction. Mountain roads are like this. When you climb you never see the same things as when you ride down again.

g) stop! - get off the bike! Walk around take some pictures!! Take your helmet off! Breath! Have a coffee, a granita or just sit around and experience life as it flows by you! It's a vacation!... 

h) Italian holidays and festivities - beware of these periods as the traffic free roads get jammed and all hotels will get fully booked.

25th to 28th March 2005   Easter weekend! 
25th April 
Liberation day (on a Monday so expect a lot of traffic this weekend)
1st May Labour day (on a Sunday for 2005 - not too bad!)
2nd June  Italian Republic foundation holiday
29th June
St.Peter and St Paul. ONLY in Rome
All of August, especially 15th. Italians and most of Europe go on vacation! Too hot anyway!!!
1st November All saints

i) equipment: we always advise people to come with their leathers and a good rain suit. Good gloves and boots are also essential. Under gloves and long johns are a practical during the half season and if you are touring the Alps. Always wear your leather trousers. We say this for experience. The smallest incident can really mess up your holiday. A slip in the car park can have you end up with a swollen knee or ankle. Your trip will be virtually over then.
If you are coming for a week or more always bring all of your equipment. You have to adapt to a new country and a new bike. The last thing you want to do is to be without your own equipment.

j) packing: our advice is to pack light. Try to work out your stops so that after 3 or 4 days you have a double night in accommodation which can offer laundry service. As an alternative bring your hand wash detergent and do your washing in the evening before dinner. It will be dry in the morning.
Our touring bikes normally will allow approx 50lt hard luggage. You can do without suits and formal clothing. Jeans, sneakers, T-shirts and pullovers are accepted practically everywhere. There is no prejudice if you walk into a hotel or restaurant with a helmet in your hand.

k) agriturismo: this type of accommodation can be found everywhere in rural areas of Italy. We personally recommend you stop in these places if they have their own restaurants. Firstly because they are reasonably priced and normally clean. Secondly because they serve the food they grow themselves and follow traditional recipes of the area. This is the website of their association: www.agriturist.it

 

 

back to top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 other services

home page


 

useful numbers

CIMT - Tel +3906 97618377
                Fax +390761 0531180
               
24hrs mobile phone line +39 339 1556988

Ambulance Emergency - 118

Polizia (police) - 113

Carabinieri (police) - 112

Fire Service - 115

 


        
back to top